Polyamine-rich food decreases age-associated pathology and mortality in aged mice

The purpose of this study was to test whether oral intake of foods rich in polyamines (spermine and spermidine) suppresses age-associated pathology in aged mice.

Synthetic polyamines were mixed into experimental chows, and 24-week-old Jc1:ICR male mice were fed one of three chows containing differing polyamine concentrations. The spermine and spermidine concentrations in the low, normal, and high polyamine chows were 143 and 224 nmol/g, 160 and 434 nmol/g, and 374 and 1540 nmol/g, respectively. An increase in concentration of polyamine in the blood was found only in mice fed the high polyamine chow at 50 weeks of age. While the body weights of mice in all three groups were similar, the survival rate of mice fed high polyamine chow was significantly higher than those in the other two groups (p = 0.011). Mice fed the high polyamine chow analyzed at 88 weeks of age, corresponding to the end of the study, demonstrated lower incidence of glomerulosclerosis and increased expression of senescence marker protein-30 in both kidney and liver compared to those fed the low polyamine chow. As these pathological changes are associated with senescence, oral polyamine appears to inhibit the progression of age-associated pathologies.

Source: ScienceDirect

Photo: www.fi.edu

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