Scientists identified brain protein that could put the brakes on Alzheimer’s

Irvine biologists blazing new approaches to studying Alzheimer’s disease have made a major finding on combating inflammation linked to the disease. The School of Biological Sciences researchers’ discovery about the role of a protein called TOM-1 heralds a shift toward examining the molecular underpinnings of Alzheimer’s processes.

The protein helps to regulate a key component of the inflammatory response. It turns out that levels of the protein are low in the Alzheimer’s brain.

The scientists discovered that reducing the amount of TOM-1 in Alzheimer’s rodent models increased pathology, which included increased inflammation, and exacerbated cognitive problems associated with the disease. Restoring TOM-1 levels reversed those effects.

This research shows that fixing the brakes at the molecular level could provide an entirely new therapeutic avenue.

Materials provided by University of California - Irvine.

Oct. 3, 2019, 10:52 a.m.

Similar articles:

The drug stops brain damage in the early stages of Alzheimer's

Scientists from the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research (new York ...

Medics have found a more complex type of dementia

American scientists conducted a long study of Alzheimer's disease and ...

AI predicts Alzheimer's disease by speech

IBM and Pfizer recently announced the results of their joint ...

Antioxidants help treat Alzheimer's disease

Australian scientists consider that antioxidants can be useful in treating ...

Alzheimer's disease may be caused by abnormally high blood pressure at night

A new study from Uppsala University, published in the journal ...

​Focused ultrasound treats Alzheimer's disease

Scientists from West Virginia University have shown that exposure to ...

Artificial neural network will help in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

Scientists from the laboratory of neuroscience and cognitive technologies of ...

Singing helped patients fight Alzheimer's

Several studies reviewed by the French magazine Le Figaro have ...

COOKIE

Our site collects information using cookies to be more convenient and customized to your needs interests. The purposes of the use of cookies are defined in Policy the processing of personal data .If you agree to continue to receive cookies, please click the "Accept" button. If you don't agree or want to resolve this issue later, please change your browser cookie settings.